Mac LEAN PUBLISHING CO. limited Montreal. Toronto. Winnipeg, ST John, London Eng, NewYori

Wyld-Darling

COMPANY, LIMITED.

prangs E90E0

Complete Samples now on the road represent

o

The choice of patterns in all qualities of CANADIAN PRINTS.

Exclusive novelties in IMPORTED PRINTS.

Newest patterns and colorings in Fancy MERCERIZED SATEENS.

/TV LINENS, an extensive range of Damask Tablings ; confined designs in Cloths and Napkins to match ; Irish, Scotch and Russian Crashes ; Checked Glasscloths, Plain and Bordered Tea Towellings ; Canvas, Shrunk Duck, Hollands, etc.

TOWELS m Damask, Huckaback and Turkish

Newest Designs in { ™V,VZ'IZ%T } "5lB/^ lnsertions

0 l and Embroideries. J and Allovers.

The Largest and Best Assortment we have ever offered the trade.

Our purchases of Dress Stuffs for Spring include Black Figures, Black Lustres in plain and figured, Broadcloths, Amazons, Poplins, Satinettes, Velours and All- Wool Cheviots in all the newest colorings.

Blouse Cloths in 31 inch Finettelaine, Wool Delaines, Mercerized Lawns, Organdies, etc.

Specials in Black ( "SurPrise," full-fashioned, "Hermsdorf Dye."

p .. 11 No. 160, with split natural wool soles " Hermsdorf Dye."

UOttOn Hosiery. ( N() |64 wjth sp|jt casnmere soles » Hermsdorf Dye."

and large range of Men's Half-Hose with natural wool and natural cashmere feet all " Herms- dorf Dye."

Also Fancy Cotton Half-Hose attractive checks, stripes and spots.

Men's Balbriggan Underwear two-thread Egyptian Yarn, in fancy stripes.

Special lines of Natural Wool and Merino Shirts and Drawers in various weights.

We carry at all times a complete assortment of Woollens and Tailors9 Trimmings—Domestic and Imported, j* j* j* j* j*

Orders by Letter Promptly Executed.

WYLD-DARLING COMPANY, LIMITED,

TORONTO.

THE -;- DRY -:- GOODS -:- REVIEW

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THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS -:- REVIEW

S. GREENSHIELDS, SON & GO.

MONTREAL. VANCOUVER, B.C.

Canadian Lining Departmen

PARIS EXPOSITION

1-9-0-0

GRAND PRIX.

In competition against the world, the Grand Prix, being the High- est Possible Award, was granted to The Montreal Cotton Co. for their exhibit of Linings. For Excellence of Weave, Brilliancy and Fastness of Colors and Perfection of Finish, their exhibit was

judged to be unsurpassed in merit.

We will continue, as heretofore, to carry the full range of goods manufactured by The Montreal Cotton CO., embracing not only all the Standard Qualities of Linings, but also all their latest productions

in Fast Black and Colored Mercerized Satins, Fine Percalines,

Moires, Spun Glass, Victoria Lawns, Checked, Spot and Lappet Muslins, etc. Also fine range of 32-in. and 54-in. Black and Colored Italian Cloths for Tailoring Trade.

We are the largest handlers of these goods in Canada.

THE :-: DRY :-■ GOODS :-: REVIEW

Flannelettes

25,000

Pieces Woven

The Entire Stock of 2 Mills

.. also . .

10,000 Pieees Printed

We are offering all of the above goods to the trade at

less than manufacturers' prices.

S. GREENSHIELDS, SON & CO.

Montreal, and Vancouver, B.C.

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS -:- REVIEW

The Dominion Cotton Mills Co.

Limited

SPRING, 1901

STAPLE LINES.

Cts.

H. Cloth 5)4

No. 1, Cloih ... 6^

Regattas, Checks, Plates Dark Fancies Aniline Fancies Blouse Styles.

( No. 2, Cloth $/2

O J Regattas, Checks, Plates

4) "j Pompadour and Aniline Fancies

O. I Light and Dark Fancies

"* "■ Mixtures and Solid Colors, Quiltings.

HHH. Heavy Cloth 10

Regattas, Plates

Dark Fancies and Mixtures

Blouse Styles

Lilacs and Pinks.

CtS.

AAA. Heavy Cloth

Aniline Fancies.

TO/2

o

4)

Q.

C. Cloth io^

Regattas, Blouse Styles Medium and Dark Fancies Aniline Fancies, Solid Colors Steel Greys Blue Greys Chambreys Lilacs and Pinks New Blues.

INDIGO.

SPECIAL.

Cts.

S.C Indigo 8^

D.C. Indigo n

XXX. Indigo. G C. Indigo. .

Cts. 1 1 i3

We would draw special attention to our Indigo Cloths. We guarantee them to be pure

Indigo Dye and serviceable goods.

FANCY LINES.

Cts.

N.N. Sateen 11

(Fancy, Aniline, Indigo.) A. Duck Costume 8^

Princess Piques

A A. Duck Costume, Indigo. A.A. " " Aniline

C. Duck Costumes

X.X. K. Skirting

Moreen Skirting . . .

H. Drill

(Indigo, Aniline, Fancy.)

Ladas Tweed

Saxony Suiting

1/2

oy2 2

*X

5

Cts.

Heavy Moles 17

Ex Heavy Moles 21

Salisbury Costumes 8

Summer Suitings 9

N.B. Costumes 9

Twill Cretonne 8

Ottoman Cretonne 10

Oat Meal Cretonne n^

Crash Suitings 12^

M. 2 Linenettes 10

C. Linenettes 12

Sateen Cretonne

Embossed Skirting to

S. GREENSHIELDS, SON & CO.,

MONTREAL, and VANCOUVER, B.C.

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS -:- REVIEW

$. 6mn$bkl(J$, Son $ Co.

Carry a Full Range of This Company's Goods.

The Colonial Bleaching k Piloting Co.,

"LIMITED

1901— SPRING PRICE LIST 1901.

PRINTS. Cts.

No. 29 Cloth, 25 in ^]A

No. 38 " 27 in 7^

No. 23 " 28 in 8^

No. 23 Aniline Fancy, 28 in Syi

No. 19 Heavy Cloth, 32 in 10

No. 19 Aniline Fancy and Navy Blue 10

No. 15 Cloth, 3 1 in 10

DUCKS.

No. 28 Cloth, 28 in 10^

SATEENS.

No. 54 Cloth, 31 32 in l23/i

No. 47 Cloth, 30-in. mercerized ^7%

KITCHENER TWEED.

No. 21 Cloth, 26 in io3^

FLANNELS.

Colonial Flannels 8

Kopje 9

TWILLS.

No. [8 Cloth, 28-in., Aniline and Navy ?>l/2

No. 6 Cloth, 32-in., " " \\]/2

We have the largest stock of these goods

in Canada.

THE -:- DRY -.- GOODS -;- REVIEW

YOU WILL BE SATISFIED

With your GLOVE SALES if you keep an assortment of

PEWNY'S KID GLOVES

ALWAYS IN STOCK.

WHY ? Because they are popular

with your lady customers.

THE FIT AND QUALITY of these gloves is

well known and appreciated.

EVERY PAIR IS GUARANTEED.

S. GREENSHIELDS, SON & CO.

MONTREAL, and VANCOUVER, B.C.

Sole Selling Agents for Canada.

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS

REVIEW

S. GREENSHIELDS, SON & CO

Montreal, and Vancouver, B.C.

Durability

in Linens

Latest Novelties in Notions

Good Styles in

Men's

Furnishings

Closest Prices

in

Staples

Dainty Curtains

Newest Patterns

in

Carpets

Systematic Letter Order Filling

Liberal

Terms

Advertising

OUR GOODS

is not confined to our announce- ments in trade papers. For many years we have been making thousands of customers satisfied annually, and these same satis- fied customers are the best advertisements we could pos- sibly have.

If our goods are not what we say they are then we owe you something. We must see they are all we claim for them, else we double our work.

Our Ever-Increasing Business

is ample proof of the sterling values in all our goods, and we can

FOR SPRING

M.MM.MMMMM

still give those same values which we know are appreciated by our army of customers as

BUSINESS-BRINGERS

Marvels

in

Dress Goods

Richness

in Silks

Fastness

in Hosiery

Largest Variety of Prints

Perfect Fit

in Gloves

All Sorts of Handkerchiefs

Good Values

in

Woollens

Numerous lines

of Indies' and

Misses' Wear

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS -:- REVIEJ

YOU ARE CERTAIN

to be asked for br ft

Cloth

DO NOT NEGLECT

to send your order in time for Spring.

IT IS THE BEST MATERIAL forr^rer

LINENS

We have now in stocks ■*

A FULL ASSORTMENT of

Housekeeping linens

THE MANUFACTURE OF

Messrs. James & Thomas Alexander, Limited Canmore Works, Dunfermline.

The goods made by this well-known firm are unequalled for their quality and

superiority of finish.

S. GREENSHIELDS, SON & CO., ,WSSSS «.

Sole Selling Agents for Canada.

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS -:- REVIEW

2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft SB 2ft 2ft ift 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2!! 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2!! 2ft 2ft 2ft £ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft 2ft i

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Cbe Penman manufacturing

£©., Cimiicd

MILLS AT

Ihorold, Coaticook and Port Dover.

HEAD OFFICES:

C5

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#

^

. . . /Mtf/$ ONT.

KNITTED Q00D5

of all descriptions

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INCLUDING

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Underwear in Cotton and Wool, Hosiery, etc.

SELLING AGENTS:

D- mortice, Sons * goM momreal and Coronto.

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10

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS -:- REVIEW

FOR

Spring

t&ti

trade.

FACTORY

CLOVES and N|lTfENS N|0((A5lNS and SHOE Pfl(S

travelling bacs leather Belts, etc, et(.

ESTABLISHED 1868.

During the more than 30 years success of our business, we have always been at the front in all that pertained to improvements in the production of Gloves and Mittens. We have brought out new ideas. We have given the Trade splendid values— goods which have possessed style, given satisfaction and long service.

Our representatives will call on the Trade In due season. /Hake it a point to see our samples before placing your orders. We guarantee satisfaction, and the maximum in value at the minimum of cost.

!s 1 1 is i ii s s i m

-- ... ' \

TANNERIES

W. ft. STOREY a SON

The Glovers of Canada.

oe ACTON, ONT.

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS

REVIEW

11

WE HAVE QUADRUPLED OUR CAPACITY

FOR MANUFACTURING

and now want to quadruple our number of customers if such a thing is possible. Our goods are sold in every part of the Dominion, and "Satisfaction Guaranteed" has been the foundation stone that has built up our large and rapidly increasing business. We are now in a position to guarantee prompt delivery, and thank our many customers for their forbearance in the past.

,^

iO

INVERNESS.

D. B. OUR SPECIALTY.

" RAGLAN."

Our travellers ars now on the road with a full line of samples, showing all the latest

Styles, Patterns and Shades.

DON'T BUY TILL YOU SEE THEM. They are the best value ever offered to the trade.

The " Beaver Brand " Macintosh is

the best and cheapest MADE or SOLD in Canada.

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY

The Beaver Rubber Clothing Co

m Limited

1849-51-51 i Notre Dame St., MONTREAL.

12

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS

REVIEW

1901 WALL PAPERS

1901

OIF

the WATSON, FOSTER CO., limited

ARTISTIC ORIGINAL SUCCESSFUL

:*:

^|V

WE CANNOT AFFORD TO OFFER YOU GOODS WHICH YOU CANNOT PROFITABLY HANDLE ,< «* ^ «* ,<

IF THE BEST IS NOT TOO GOOD FOR YOU & <* &

WE WILL SEND YOU PRE- PAID SAMPLE BOOKS OF ANY GRADE OF PAPERS YOU ARE LIKELY TO BE SHORT OF INCLUDING INGRAINS, WHICH THIS SEASON ARE SUPERB. «<

DO NOT DELAY, THERE IS A LIMIT TO SUPPLY Jt j*

the WATSON, FOSTER CO, u«te.

MONTREAL.

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS -:- REVIEW

13

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THE

JOHN D. IVEY CO.

LIMITED

Wholesale milliners.

vi.f......«i.l«...«i..irl.iriilriiii>ifiVr..r^

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^WWWWWfflWM'WV^MVW.WWWMWK

^

Wishing You the Compliments of tb& Saaspt/^ 0/l/f

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Hew Vcar$

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^v%^w^v^www^^vww^

Greetings

WWWVWIVIWVWW\

Travellers covering the Dominion with the finest range of SPRING SAMPLES we've ever shown. No live milliner can afford to miss seeing our magnificent range for 1901.

Try Our Letter Order Department.

Coromo.

Montreal.

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14

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS

REVIEW

Lister's

To be had from

Silks

Velvets

Sealettes

WHOLESALE DRY GOODS and MILLINERY HOUSES.

Wm. Parks & Son, l

iraited

ST. JOHN, N.B.

c

5*i&RUNSW)CK_c0-tTO<* ^

otton Spinners, Bleachers, Dyers flanufacturers

Agents . . .

J. SPROUL SMITH, 71 Front Street West, Toronto.

DAVID KAY, Fraser Building, Montreal.

JOHN HALLAM, 83 Front Street East, Toronto, Agent for Beam Warps for Ontario.

4? 4*

STJOHN COTTON M1L^S

Flannelettes, Saxonys, Yarns,

Beam Warps,

miMtH

The Only "WATER TWIST" Yarn Made in Canada.

THE -:- DRY -;- GOODS -:- REVIEW 15

OK ° , I

Bagky $ Olrigbt Itif a. go. }

$ 318 St. James St., ||

I ^^v-^MONTREAL. *

I

I

i i 1 i ! i 1

/? ^

ART MUSLINS, CRETONNES, HOSIERY, HANDKERCHIEFS, TOWELS, LINENS, TAILORS' TRIMMINGS.

J

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i I

& No retailer can afford to pass us on the above W

$> lines, as we can show better values than any other w

A house in the trade. w

I I I

I I I I

16 THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS -:- REVIEW

In Buying; g

®

Campbell's

Iiinen

Thread

you secure the best made.

GIVE IT A TRIAL.

ACENTS FOR CANADA:

lobn Gordon $ Son

MONTREAL.

$msmm^9^s^s^9mmi9ssms^mi9^9^9m&

THE CANADIAN

Vol. XI.

MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JANUARY, 1901

No. 1.

LONDON SHOPS AND SHOPPING

A Few Notes by a Canadian Visitor.

WHETHER a person goes to London as a buyer of goods, or merely as a visitor for pleasure, he usually does a little shopping on his own account.

It is useful to know something of the London shops from a strictly business point of view. Not only the array of goods, but their arrangement and the methods employed in selling them, are usually observed. The visitor who has been mak- ing his purchases as a merchant from the warehouses in the famous dry goods district that lies around and about St. Paul's Cathedral will often visit the retail shops in that district.

There are many excellent retail establishments between Ludgate Hill and the Bank of England, and experience shows that one often pays really less for some articles in these shops than he would for the same articles in the West End. The clerks and saleswomen are civil and obliging, prompt to serve, and the windows are well-filled with goods, and if many of the shops are small the stocks seem well selected.

There is, it is true, not much attention given to artistic effect in the dressing ot the windows along the Poultry, Cheapside, and Ludgate. Hill. There is apt to be too much profusion in the windows. They would be likely enough to strike the eye of the visitor who is on the lookout for something to buy, because the goods are usually ticketed with the price, and the variety arouses attention. But from my experience I would imagine that the windows in this district would never strike

a casual passerby and induce him to go in and purchase. It is the person who is on the lookout for what he wants who gazes in these windows.

But for real magnificence, both in the display of goods and in the appearance of buildings, one must go to the West End. Of course, the shops along both sides of the Strand are excellent. One can get some very high-class goods there, but, speaking generally, the windows are not large, and they are so filled with goods, especially the men's furnishings establishments, that they actually darken the shop inside. On more than one occasion I have bought a necktie in those men's furnishings shops that are on the Strand, near Fleet street, and when I have got back to the hotel the colors of the tie have seemed quite different from what they looked to be

in the shop. This was due, of course, to defective light.

* + *

However, it is when one gets out to Piccadilly Circus and begins to go up Regent street that one realizes what London shops are. This street, during the height of the season, with its handsome shops, its show of fine carriages, prancing horses, and gay company, is certainly one of the most striking features

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No. 1. Piccadilly Circus, with Swan & Edgar's in the Foreground.

18

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS -;- REVIEW

LONDON SHOPS AND SHOPPING— Continued.

in Europe, particularly about four of the afternoon of a fine day in May or June.

No one street in Paris impresses me as being so distinctly a shopping street for wealthy people as this. If you stand beside the fountain in Piccadilly Circus you find yourself right

have failed to notice the fine window displays of laces and men's furnishings which are shown in the windows on this street. The Circus frontage usually shows curtains, draperies, etc., while along the Quadrant side one notices the dress

goods and millinery.

* * *

One word with reference to the Quadrant it is, as most opposite the fine premises of Swan & Edgar. (See accom- visitors to London know, the name applied to the bend in panying engraving). The establishment of Swan & Edgar is Regent street, which begins just at Piccadilly Circus and to one of the most famous in England, is known as a haber- cause which the rows of shops were built exactly in their dasher's, and is the resort of fashionable customers from all present shape. Years ago there used to be a row of pillars, or over the Kingdom. It has practically three frontages, first on columns, on each side of this portion of the street, which was, the Circus, second on that part of Regent street called the therefore, called the Colonnade, but/as the roofs, which came Quadrant, and, thirdly, on Piccadilly. And no one who has out from the first storeys and were supported by these strolled, along Piccadilly in the direction of Hyde Park can columns, greatly darkened the interiors of the shops, the

columns were all removed in 1848.

As everyone knows, this whole district belongs to New London, and not to Old London. Conse- quently, the buildings are all modern, and have not that ancient appearance which strikes one in the buildings east of Temple Bar. The streets also are wide. In fact, few improvements which have been effected in London during the last century are more remarkable than the entire transformation of this district into a fine modern retail shopping area. The ground now covered by Regent, Bond and Oxford streets was once a very unpromising place, and at one part, during the plague of 1665, the corpses of the unlucky victims were flung into an open field. All this is now changed by the extension of the town westward, and Oxford street, which was, I think, in early times part of the old high road to the city of Oxford from London, has shared in the develop ment of retail business in this fashionable quarter of London.

* * * It is nearly a mile from Piccadilly Circus up Regent street to Oxford street, and shops line the street on both sides the whole way. It is a sight to walk along the pavement on either side, while, if one takes in the scene from the top of an omni- bus, the display of goods and the brilliant win- dows make a sight not easily forgotten. Carriages are stopped in front of many shops. Brilliantly dressed women are seen passing from carriage to shop, or driving along the street, and over the doors are names that are very familiar to the business men who know anything of London, and of the world's retail dry goods trade.

While there are plenty of shops on Regent and Oxford streets as well-known as Peter Robinson's, at the same time this very extensive and success- ful business is typical of the larger fashionable . shops in this part of London. The illustration

THE -:- DRY :- GOODS -:- REVIEW

19

LONDON SHOPS AND SHOPPING— Continued.

(No. 3) gives some idea of the size of the establishment, be- cause it is only one, and, in fact, one of the smallest of the several buildings occupied by the whole establishment. It is situated near the conjunction of Regent and Oxford streets, and is known as Peter Robinson's mourning warehouse, though its windows are usually given up to anything but mourning goods. A building farther up the street, quite separate and distinct from the one lower down.is the stationery and fancy goods department of the same firm, which is in London parlance called The Bazaar. This department joins the largest building occupied by the Peter Robinson business, which is on Oxford street, extending east to Great Portland street. Under this roof is an enormous space, and in the various departments are sold everything which we in Canada would include in the stock of a departmental dry goods store. * * *

If the reader will look at the accompanying engraving of Regent street (No. 3), he will notice just north of Peter Robin- son's mourning warehouse a shorter building with a flagpole and several coats-of-arms over the door and window. This is the famous millinery establishment of Madame Louise, Limited. Directly opposite, on the other corner on Regent street and Oxford Circus, is Jay's, another well-known Lon- don shop. In fact, this whole district is crowded with shops which the average visitor will want to inspect. Two other fashionable milliners, namely, Elise and Pauline, have their establishments on this street. Walking up Regent street on the right hand side one would pass by the two establishments of Liberty & Co., Robinson & Cleavers, Swears & Wells (boys' outfitters), Fuller's confectionery and tea rooms, Dickins & Jones, Limited, Peter Robinson's mourning warehouse. On the left side one finds Scott Adie's Scotch warehouse, The International Fur Stores, with its windows showing magnificent fur garments, Tiffany & Co.'s jewelery shop, which is notic- able by its absence of display windows. The United States flag floats over The American Shoe Co., while farther up by Oxford Circus is Jay's, as al- ready noted.

Turning east along Oxford street, a short distance on the south side, is the chief ware- house of Henry Heath & Co , Limited, one of the most fash- ionable hat makers of London. The establishment is a very fine one, like that of Lincoln & Bennett, who have shops both on Piccadilly and Sack- ville street. Christy & Co.,

whose hats are renowend the world over, have their main place of business in the city, at 35 Gracechurch street.

If you want to see the establishment of Poole, the famous tailor, you must turn off Regent street toward the west, just at the head of the Quadrant, into Vigo street, and go up Saville Row. At this establishment, as is well-known, the practice is to demand of a new customer an introduction from some former patron of the place, and there is an anecdote told of how, to win a wager, this rule was set aside by the customer being able to satisfy the head of the establishment without actually producing the introduction.

Speaking of the most fashionable millinery establishments in London, reminds me that ladies who have been there, wishing to indulge in the luxury of a London bonnet or hat, say that the prices are simply "frightful," that is, frightful from the point of view of a moderate income. One lady purchaser told me a story of how she made a wager with a friend to get any hat she chose in one of these establishments at one-third less the original price asked. This lady, although a Canadian, spoke French fluently and would not be easily mistaken for an "American," which is the name applied to all visitors from across the Atlantic by Londoners. By firmly resisting the saleswoman, who was very courteous, she got one or two reductions in the price. The saleswoman at each drop in price had to go to the forewoman for permission to consent to the reduction. Finally, as the story is told to me, the triumphant purchaser managed to get the coveted article at one-third less, which she assured me was even then more than its value.

But I have no experience, personally, of this kind, and must testify that, in the great majority of London shops,

■-»nW

ifl

No. 3.— Regent Street, Looking North prom Kelow Oxford Circus.

20

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS -:- REVIEW

LONDON SHOPS AND SHOPPING Continued.

the prices of the article seem to be fixed, and do not go up or down according to the mood of the purchaser or the sales- woman.

Without having shopped extensively in this section of London, yet, after visiting a number of shops, it does not strike me that we have much to learn in the way of interior display'or arrangement. The class of people who buy in these shops do not demand that perfect system which is re- duced to such perfection in the cheaper stores of London and the principal provincial cities of England, like Birmingham, Manchester and Liverpool. The ladies who drive into Regent street to shop are wealthy, or, at least, have a large command of money or ciedit.and, while the feminine mind is said never to be above a bargain, their idea of a bargain, and yours, or mine, is very different. A visit should also be paid to White- ley's enormous retail establishment, which is north of Kensington Gardens, and may be reached conveniently by the Underground Railway, the visitor getting out at Bayswater station and walking north a short distance to Westbourne Grove. The Whiteley shops remind one somehow of Carsley's stores in Montreal, and indicate, like his, an enormous retail business well conducted.

* * *

In visiting the Regent street shops the Canadian is impressed by the almost entire absence of the pneumatic or other cash carrier systems in vogue with us, and, as a rule, the clerk who sells the goods restores them all to their places and wraps up the parcel while the customer waits.

Another arrangement which is not altogether convenient is that, if one is making purchases in several departments, each purchase represents a separate transaction, a separate bill and a separate parcel. The disadvantage of this is obvious.

One does not go in any of these shops to " look around." The custom in Montreal, Toronto, Chicago or New York of calmly walking through department after department in search of something or nothing, could not comfortably be carried on here. The moment you enter the door you are pounced upon by the " shop-walker," and immediately escorted to whatever department you think you want. There you are often shown what you do not ask for, and, if no purchase results, the shop- walker is called to hold a cross examination before the victim can leave the shop. To go into some of these shops, there- fore, is to let one's self in for a purchase, or a very unpleasant time either with the clerk or that somewhat irritating official, the shop walker. A lady from Toronto, who is not overly fond of the system in vogue here, says she has several times been so pestered by the shopwalkers, that she has more than once had to say, "Gentlemen, if you have no objection, I would like to pass."

Another lady, also a Canadian, says that she has been in one of the largest of these shops times without number that is to say, probably dozens of times and yet she doesn't know the first thing about the lay out of the place. She goes in, is seized by a shop -walker, is hurried through to the department, makes her purchase, and then her exit by the most accessible door. If she should loiter on the way, thinking to see something as she passes, she is asked, "What can I show youmadame ?" by other shop-walkers, or else is followed as a suspicious character. No, ladies don't shop for amusement in London.

But it is fair to keep in mind that these shops do not cater to the masses, but to the classes, and the proprietors should know best how to hold this kind of trade. D.O.M.

MERCHANTS AND MUNICIPAL CONTROL.

VALUABLE organization exists in the town of Ingersoll, Ontario, which is of the highest interest and importance to retail mer- chants. It is called The Taxpayers' As- sociation, and at the head of it are the leading business men of the town. It grew out of dissatisfaction with the muni- cipal management of town affairs.

In order to insure a business like character to the manage- ment of the town, the business men met and organized this association. They appointed a special committee to select suitable candidates for municipal offices. This committee waited on a number of the most desirable men in the town and secured their consent to allow their names to go on the " ticket." Out of these eligible men were selected a mayor, six councillors, besides members for the school board. The list of names on the "ticket" were printed on slips and distributed among the voters. The consequence was that every member of the "ticket" was elected, both for the council and school board. The affairs of the town are con- ducted entirely with a view to the best business interests of the place and regardless of any special interests or prejudices which often arise in towns, but which have really no direct relation to the conduct of municipal affairs.

The association being a permanent organization meets regularly to consider any questions that come up affecting the town, and thus keeps in touch with the representatives of the town in the council. The membership is about 240 and the attendance at the average meeting is about 50, which is a very creditable display of local interest in public affairs. The secretary, Mr. A. J. Clark, in a reply to a question from The Dry Goods Review, says : " All our members are proud to say that they belong lo The Taxpayers' Association, and I hope that the formation of an association like ours . will be taken up in other towns throughout Canada, as I think such a society would be of value to any town."

It happens that in Ingersoll The Taxpayers' Association replaces the old board of trade, an organization which has been allowed to lapse. There can be no doubt that in towns where a Board of Trade already exists it can be turned to precisely the same uses as the organization at Ingersoll ; that is, it need not occupy its whole time with purely commercial matters, but can take in every phase of business life which relates to the welfare of the town. Its membership, of course, should include not only merchants but the other good and most influential citizens of the place.

The officers of The Ingersoll Taxpayers' Association are :

M. Walsh, president.

John Ross, vice-president.

J. P. Bowles, treasurer.

A. J. Clark, secretary, with an executive committee of three members from each ward in the town.

During the year the president calls meetings at the request of five members of the association, and any problems which are then before the municipal council are taken up and dis- cussed, and assistance is given where the municipal authorities are on the right track. This enables the council to act with full support of the whole community behind it, and it is a proof of the value of such cooperation that Ingersoll is one of the best administered municipalities in the Dominion.

These facts are set forth in these columns because they point a useful moral for application elsewhere.

THE -:- DRY -:- GOODS -:- REVIEW

21

A DRY GOODS DICTIONARY OF TRADE TERMS

FOR THE CONVENIENCE OF BUSINESS MEN.

Armure A chain weave in which the threads are thrown in

alternating small pebbled design. Used in silks and

dress goods. Applique Materials cut out and sewed, embroidered or

pasted on other materials. Alpaca Cloth made from the glossy wool of the alpaca of

Chile and Peru, an animal of the camel tribe. The cloth

is glossy after weaving, and is now made with a cotton

warp. Also known as lustre cloth. Angora Cloth, fringe or shawls made of the soft fleece of the

Asian angora goat.

B

Barre Materials having stripes on bars running across the cloth produced by various processes of weaving or printing.

Bayadere Designs which run across the material, whether

ribbons, laces, dress goods or silks. Beige Dress fabrics of smooth texture produced by using

yarn in which the colors are mixed. Bengaline A plain, round, corded weave of silk and wool in

which the wool is used as a filling covered by the silk.

Smooth in surface, small in grain. Bolero A small, short top jacket, with or without sleeves,

cut in Spanish style, a separate garment from the under

waist. Bodice A circlet or girdle of material used as a broad belt.

The original was pointed back and front, but now a variety

of forms are so called.

Bourette An effect produced by introducing lumpy, knotted yarn in the weaving. The yarn so introduced is woven in at intervals, forming patterns or creating an evenly arranged rough surface.

Broche An effect where the warp design is raised in floats and appears as though embossed on the surface of the fabric. These goods are made on jacquard looms on which each individual warp thread is manipulated separ- ately so as to accord with the designs.

Balayeuse (from the French balayeur, a sweeper) A ruffle or frill which is used in the edge of a dress skirt to keep the train clean as it sweeps along the floor.

Basket Weave Style of weave in which the plaited work of a basket is reproduced by the pattern.

Batiste A fine cotton muslin having a good deal of dressing, resembling lawn, the difference being that batiste is slightly heavier. (Batiste, French for cambric.)

Bedford Cord A weave used in dress goods similar to cotton pique, consisting of heavy ribs running lengthwise in the fabric.

Bias A cut made diagonally or at an oblique angle to the texture of a fabric.

Blonde Lace Lace made of unbleached silk. Nets in cotton or silk that are unbleached or cream colored.

Bobbinet or Brussels Machine-made cotton or silk netting in which a hexagonal figure is produced by twisting the thread.

Box Plait A double fold or plait formed by folding the cloth alternately in opposite directions so as to form a kind of plait from each side.

Brandenburgs A variety of ornamental buttons made in the shape of an oblong, narrow cylinder, smaller at the ends than in the middle. Usually a wooden mold covered with silk or mohair and worn with loops on the front of garments and to fasten men's overcoats. Called frogs on women's garments.

Buckram Coarse linen cloth stiffened with glue.

c Canvas Plain woven cloths of cotton, wool or linen made in

the sailcloth style. Cabochon A round buckle or brooch. Canotier Sailor style, cloth or hat.

Cashmere A wool fabric twilled on one side only, with soft

finish. Cassimere A general term applied to all-wool cloths used for

men's clothing, made of woollen yarn. Challie An extremely light-weight dress fabric, cotton or

wool, woven without twill, free from dressing. Cheesecloth Thin muslin, bleached or brown, free from

sizing. Cheviot Twilled, nappy woollen cloth. Chiffon A transparent fine woven silk gauze. Chinchilla Skin of a pearl-grey South-American mountain

squirrel. Also heavy overcoating in a double-woven

fabric with napped surface rolled into little tufts. Chine